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The King of Dinosaurs

Collections & Database

The department maintains several notable collections of human and primate remains, and fossil casts of hominoids and other primates. These are used in a range of disciplines, from evolutionary study to pathology, prosthetic prototyping and orthopedics.
 
Access to the collections is free for non-commercial use with approval of the curator or collections manager. To learn more about the contents of any department collection, contact the collections manager.

Read the policies and guidelines for use of collections.
Request access to the collections.

Hamann-Todd Human Osteological Collection

This collection contains more than 3,000 cadaver-derived human skeletons collected by Carl A. Hamann and T. Wingate Todd between 1912 and 1938. Superb documentation makes this the world’s largest documented collection of modern human skeletal remains.
 
The Hamann-Todd Human Osteological Collection is accessible for legitimate research and study by qualified investigators. Access is free for non-commercial use.
 
A separate pathological collection, the Dudley Peter Allen Pathological Collection, consists of more than 400 skeletons with recorded pathological cases illustrating bone disease and trauma as it appeared in individuals who lived prior to the 1920s—before the advent of antibiotics. Contact the collections manager for further information and a list of available specimens.
 
Download the Human Collection database in Excel format.
Learn more about T. Wingate Todd and the origin of the collection.
 

Hamann-Todd Non-Human Primate Osteological Collection

With more than 1,000 non-human primate skeletons purchased by Carl A. Hamann and T. Wingate Todd from private collections and the taxidermy firm Gerrard & Sons of London, this collection includes the great apes—chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans.
 
Sixty-eight primate skeletal specimens (some with skins) are contained in the distinct Cleveland Museum of Natural History Primate Skeletal Collection, assembled by Museum personnel. Some of these specimens were collected by Museum expeditions to Central America and Africa in the early 20th Century. More recently, zoos have donated specimens to be documented, macerated and preserved for the future. Future donations of primate material to the Museum will be added to this collection, complementing the Hamann-Todd Collection, which is closed to new additions.
 
Both the Hamann-Todd Non-Human Primate Osteological Collection and the CMNH Primate Skeletal Collection are accessible for legitimate research and study by qualified investigators. Access is free for non-commercial use.
 
Download the Non-human Primate Collection database in Excel format.
 

Johns Hopkins Human Fetal Skull Collection

This collection contains approximately 112 disarticulated fetal skulls collected by Adolph H. Schultz, a 20th-century primatologist and anatomist who worked at the Johns Hopkins Medical school from 1916 to 1951. One of his interests was human embryology, and he collected human fetal skulls from still births of that era in Baltimore, Maryland.
 
Schultz visited the Hamann Museum of Comparative Anatomy and Anthropology at Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve University) several times to examine specimens. When he returned to his native Zurich in 1951, his collection of fetal skulls was left behind. Another Hopkins anatomist, Dr. David Bodian, who had been a member of the Western Reserve University anatomy faculty during World War II, arranged to have the collection transferred to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History on a permanent loan in 1973.
 
The Johns Hopkins Human Fetal Skull Collection is accessible for legitimate research and study by qualified investigators. Access is free for non-commercial use.

Download the Human Fetal Skull Collection database in Excel format.
 

Fossil Hominoid Cast Collection

This collection consists of over 3,000 casts of various fossil hominoids and other primates. It is largely used for comparative analysis in human evolutionary studies. The department’s fossil cast collection consists primarily of casts of fossil specimens recovered from sites in eastern Africa and South Africa, with some from Eurasia. Almost all of the casts of Australopithecus afarensis specimens (including Lucy and those from A.L. 333) discovered prior to the 1980s are present in the collection.
 
The Fossil Hominoid Cast Collection is accessible by consent of the curator for legitimate research and study by all qualified investigators. Access is free for non-commercial use. Contact the curator or collections manager for a complete list of available casts.

If you are a student or professional who would like to conduct research using the Hamann-Todd Collection, please visit our Research Request page.